Adrienne

Mom to multiple losses:

17 week loss in December 2010,

Chemical pregnancy in March 2012,

Missed miscarriage (possible molar pregnancy) in June 2012,

and

Chemical pregnancy in October 2012

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

My journey began in August of 2010 when I found out I was pregnant after just six months of trying. I was stunned that it happened so easily and quickly. We didn’t chart, take my temperature or use any Ovulation Predictor Kits. I simply went off birth control, relaxed, had fun and it happened! My husband and I were so excited. I was already 8 weeks along when I found out, because I’d had some spotting that I thought was my period. [Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2012/10/6133.html

Debbie

Mom to Mila

December 15, 2011

Moreno Valley, California

I had butterflies in my tummy the moment I found out I was pregnant. I knew this would be my baby girl instantly.  I am the mother of 2 healthy boys and I was finally going to have my baby girl. In October I had my first prenatal visit and heard the heartbeat of my precious angel. My husband and I had not planned on having another child at this time, but we were ready to welcome a new baby. We made plans instantly, planned how we would reorganize the house to make it ready for our baby, we started saving since we were no amateurs and knew how much diapers and formula cost. We decided together not to tell our families until we knew the sex of the baby and we didn’t want the kids to know until we knew if they were having a brother or sister. I had all of my routine first trimester lab work and ultrasound done and everything was fine. We had a due date on May 20, 2012, right before summer which was perfect (I didn’t want to be pregnant in the dry desert heat). [Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2012/01/4580.html

Hannah

Mom to baby lost at 6 weeks August 2007

Benjamin Jason and Naomi Makenzie (twins), lost at 17 weeks
Born sleeping January 2, 2010

Albuquerque, New Mexico

In 2007 I found out I was unexpectedly pregnant. It definitely wasn’t planned, but I was immediately very excited from the time I saw those two pink lines! I was on cloud 9 because all I ever wanted was to be a mommy. My boyfriend at the time was living out of town so he decided he would move to where I live and we would get an apartment and start our little family. We started thinking of names for our baby. My boyfriend thought of Doroteo for a little boy, named after his grandfather, who was his main father figure and who he actually called dad rather than grandpa. I agreed that if we have a boy he would be named Doroteo and I decided I liked Imalda for a girl. I started being very cautious of everything I ate, drank, I didn’t lift heavy things, I took my prenatal vitamins every day. I made sure to take care of my baby so I could have a healthy little boy or girl. [Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2012/01/4478.html

Emily

Missed miscarriage at 12 weeks in December 2010,
Blighted ovum at 7 weeks in April 2011,
and missed miscarriage at 17 weeks in September 2011

Near Albany, New York

The story of my first missed miscarriage is here: http://facesofloss.com/2011/01/652.html. Since that time, I’ve had two additional losses.

I found myself pregnant again at the end of March 2011. I had betas drawn, and it didn’t look good. It was a 133 hour doubling time, when it should have been 24-48 hours. I went in for my first ultrasound at 6.5 weeks and only saw an empty sac. They tried to reassure me that it was in the right place, to give it time, but I started bleeding a few days later. Follow-up ultrasound and betas confirmed a completed natural miscarriage. It had been a blighted ovum. [Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2012/01/4394.html

Alisha

Mom to Hunter Grace

Born still on December 17th, 2009

Wareham, Massachusetts

My husband and I were so excited to find out that we were expecting baby number 3 in September 2009. We already had two girls 5 and 2 1/2 years old. [Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/12/4176.html

Nicole

Mom to Gracen Maize

Born asleep May 3, 2011

Mount Pleasant, Michigan

My story initially starts in October 2010 – the 25th to be exact. That was the day we got our first positive pregnancy test after 16 months of actively trying. We were blissfully excited until about 5 weeks along when I started spotting. Beta draws revealed that the numbers weren’t doubling like they should have been. An ultrasound at 6 weeks determined there to be nothing in the sac. My OB suspected a blighted ovum. We scheduled another ultrasound for a week later. The night before the ultrasound, I miscarried, on my own, at 7 weeks.

[Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/11/3658.html

Jon

Father of

Oscar – born and died July 30th, 2009

Bella – born and died July 30th, 2009

and Tittle – miscarried January 2010

Madison, Wisconsin

I guess it all starts at age 2 for me. That is how old I was when my father left, and that is the start of molding me into the man I have become today. As I look back on it not having a father has made me into the father that I am today. [Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/10/3409.html

Linea Gwynne

Mother to Noah – January 2007

and Jack – March 2009

Noah was out third pregnancy.  We had no issues with conceiving, same as our other two children. Our son was 6 at the time and our daughter was 3.  Things were progressing wonderfully with this pregnancy. Normal morning sickness, very tired, loved my growing belly.  Then at my 16-week ultrasound exam our Dr. found a few anomalies that concerned her so we were scheduled for a Level II ultrasound the following week.  [Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/10/3314.html

Cassie

Mom to a baby boy

November 2010

Grafton, Wisconsin

So we went to my parents house for Thanksgiving and had a good visit with family on the actual day. And the Saturday after Thanksgiving we had a baby shower and that was nice.

Now Sunday after Thanksgiving is the day that my life as I knew it changed… [Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/08/2876.html

Alyssa Vargas

Mom to

Baby girl Abi

born at 17 weeks November 23, 2010

Baby boy Abel

born at 20 weeks July 25, 2011

Modesto ,California

 

My life as a mother started in 2007 when I was only 19 years old, blessed with a healthy little girl my daughter Aliana was born October 6, 2007. Aliana is now 3 years old and has had to say goodbye to a brother and a sister within a period of 8 months. [Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/08/2789.html

Margot

Mom to identical twin boys, 17 weeks along

June 2nd, 2011

Charlotte, NC

I prayed it wouldn’t happen to us.

[Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/08/2757.html

Sheena

Mom to Alexander Michael

2nd trimester angel, born June 30, 2011 due to Incompetent cervix

and 10 early losses July 2004-Sept 2007

Calgary, Alberta Canada

My journey to become a mother started in July 2004. My boyfriend (now husband) and I discovered we were pregnant, I had just turned 20. The timing was not perfect and there were so many things going on between us in our relationship that we were not sure where this was headed, but we were excited. I had had a previous child in 2002 and had given him up for adoption, and since that day I had always felt I was missing that part of me that yearned to be a mother. I don’t regret placing my first child for adoption, I know I wasn’t ready and neither was the babies father, and the family I placed him with were very loving, and experienced a lot of loss on their journey. [Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/07/2667.html

Tabitha
Mother of Garrison Terrelle
Born Sleeping at 17 weeks 2 days
On December 26, 2010
St. Petersburg, Florida 
 
I am Tabitha Shorter mother to Garrison Terrelle Shorter who was born sleeping December 26, 2010 with my nose and his father’s lips and mouth. Gary and I met the summer 2008 while I was teaching and coaching basketball in South Carolina and we talked a couple of times during the summer. Gary is professional photographer as well as a Networking Engineer so he always had a busy schedule. It was not until November 2008, that he just happened to call me as I was coming home from a basketball game which we had lost miserably. He had decided to end communication previously because we lived in two separate states. I lived in South Carolina and he lived in Georgia, but actually we were not that far away. So, when he called me he told me that he investigated the distance through Google maps and concluded that it was not that far.

[Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/01/662.html

Lisa
Mom to Lewis Jack Warner
December 29th, 2010
Indianapolis, Indiana
I married my high school sweetheart, Jon, nearly eight years ago. After years of playing with nieces and nephews and talking incessantly about what our children would be like, we decided it was time to expand our family. On September 27th of last year we saw two pink lines. We jumped up and down. We kissed. We danced. We nicknamed our little one Ziggy. We immediately shared the news with family. We only made it a few more weeks before we told the world. My due date was set for June 7th, one day before my birthday. My pregnancy was great. Other than being tired and having some headaches, I felt wonderful. My baby bump grew fast, and I loved it. I couldn’t wait to look down and not be able to see my toes. I was blessed to be able to feel butterfly kicks really early too. I never imagined that those kicks wouldn’t get stronger.

[Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/01/648.html

Krystal
Mom to Jude Faye Malling
Lost on May 8th, 2007 at 17.5 weeks gestation
When I was nineteen years old I was told that I could not have children. 
 
My family doctor believed that Ii had PCOS. She then sent me to an OBGYN to have him make sure that my ovaries were alright. The first appointment with him, he did not run a pregnancy test on me. He prescribed me the nuva ring and Prozac for the pain. I was glad to take the prescriptions thinking they were going to help. The following month I went back to his office. When the nurse asked how I had been I told her my body was acting weird. I had a stomach virus for over eight days when my sister and room mate had only had it two days. I was also running a fever of 102.00 for most of the eight days. Tthe nurse then told me she would run a pregnancy test and I told her “it will be negative, I can’t get pregnant!” The nurse did not return to my room, however the doctor did. He then told me that I was over three months pregnant. I told him that could not be so he did an ultrasound to prove me wrong.

[Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2011/01/627.html

Angela
Mom to Dash Alexander Grieger
April 22nd, 2010
Queen Creek, AZ
It’s hard to know where to start this story, knowing how painfully it ends. I want to preface with the disclaimer that I have no filter on my heart. When I write of my son, I do not sensor details for the sake of others. He was and forever is my baby, his life was as important as any other and the story of his life and birth should be told in honor of him.  I dont want there to be any obligation on my part to shield others from awkwardness, talking about Dash is the best therapy I have and I tell his story freely and without guilt. I am not afraid that I will forget, I am afraid that others will forget. Therefor I speak of him often, openly and lovingly.

[Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2010/09/212.html

Michele
Mom to Nicholas, February 1st, 2008, lived for one hour
Sophia, February 16th, 2008, lived for five minutes
and Alexander, November 23rd, 2009, lived for five minutes
Harleysville, PA

After nearly a decade of infertility, I was diagnosed with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) and treated with ovulatory drugs to facilitate getting pregnant. On our first medicated cycle, we conceived our twins, Nicholas and Sophia. My pregnancy was textbook; and, joys of all joys, we found out we were having a boy and girl at thirteen weeks.
Three weeks later, our world collapsed. After a relaxing day, I was making dinner when I doubled over in pain. Feeling the need to go to the bathroom, I sat down and, almost instantly, delivered my son, Nicholas, into my hand. He was moving, and, as my husband called 911, he reached for his father’s finger, wrapping his tiny hand around as much of his father as he could.

Within moments, the EMTs arrived and did their best, and, at the time, the thought that my sweet little boy could die never crossed my mind. In retrospect, I know that sounds insane, seeing as he weighed a little over an eighth of a pound and was the length of an ink pen. But he was moving and breathing; surely that meant they could save him. The Fire Department Chaplain had heard the call of a woman in premature labor and had responded as well; on that cold, rainy, February night, he collected water in a used coffee cup and baptized my son shortly before we were airlifted to Children’s Hospital.

While in the Medevac, the EMT gave Nicholas an APGAR of 2 and, as we touched down in Philadelphia, 12 minutes later, my son died en route to the emergency room. Laying on the gurney as doctors who were used to working with children tried to stop my labor and stabilize me for transport to the hospital next door, that kind EMT appeared and when I asked, as I had for our entire time together, if my son was alright, I saw a tear roll down his cheek. He closed his eyes and shook his head no, before he touched his forehead to mine. I can still remember my sharp intake of breath… The knowledge that my firstborn son was gone… That my son had died… I couldn’t breathe; I couldn’t even begin to catch my breath. The doctors and nurses continued to their work, as I watched a nurse explain to my husband that our son was simply too young to save. She wrapped him in a blanket and I saw Peter clutch that little bundle to his tearstained face.

How? How could this happen? I had had a perfect pregnancy; my scans were outstanding. My cervix was “beautiful” and long. Hadn’t I paid my dues, with a miscarriage early in our marriage followed by 9 years of infertility, and medications to even conceive? I’d followed every recommendation from what not to eat to how to sleep. I never missed a prenatal vitamin or doctor’s appointment. I ate organic food. So why? What happened?

Our OB had no real answers. My pregnancy had been textbook since conception. There were two options; either I simply couldn’t carry more than one baby or my cervix had prematurely dilated for no reason. And then, sometimes, women lost their first second trimester pregnancy just because… and then went on to have perfectly healthy, normal ones. But, he insisted, we would be proactive “the next time” and place a cervical stitch called a cerclage. His specialty was a Shirodkar, which he felt would bring me to viability and beyond.

Three months later, we were blessed with a pregnancy that, heartbreakingly, wasn’t meant to go beyond the first eight weeks. After one missed cycle, we conceived our son, Alexander, and opted to keep our pregnancy a secret until the cerclage was placed. But as our ultrasounds progressed, we were given the news that the risk of miscarriage from the cerclage would be 50% because of how low Alexander had implanted and based on the partial previa of my placenta. Weighing our options, we decided on ultrasounds every 2 weeks and to postpone the cerclage until the risk factors had decreased. At my 16 week ultrasound, things looked good; my placenta was migrating into a more advantageous position and Alexander was playing soccer with whatever internal organs he could find. I finally breathed a sigh of relief; we had crossed the threshold of Nicholas’s birth. We would be alright. I would have the surgery (if it was even needed) and Alexander would be an Easter baby.

Three days after that ultrasound, I was admitted to the hospital for premature dilation. The following day, my water broke. But Alexander was a fighter; it wasn’t until I had a placental abruption two days after my water broke that he had no choice but to enter this world too premature to survive. Having lived through this twice before, we asked the nurses and on-call doctor to leave us alone and to let us birth naturally and together. A priest was called, and he prayed over us. We took our last family nap together. And, a few hours into seventeen weeks, Alexander made his entrance into the world as his sister had, as Peter delivered our second son. He was breach and his feet kicked out first; after three pushes, he arrived in a perfect, peaceful birth. He kicked and his little shoulders moved back and forth as he stretched his limbs. A kind nurse we had called baptized him, and, as they wrapped him in a blanket, his little arms slowed and his muscular legs relaxed. By the time he was placed in my arms, he had drifted off to sleep, never to wake again.

We spent the morning, napping as a family… knowing that we would leave the hospital with a memory box instead of a baby. Peter’s parents came later in the morning to see their youngest grandchild, and our priest drove up after Mass unexpectedly, as our son was being prepared and delicately wrapped for the undertaker. He prayed over him and comforted us in our grief while we prepared to leave the hospital. After a bout with postpartum eclampsia, we planned our second memorial service and prepared to introduce our third child to family and friends, as we asked them to say good-bye.

At my postpartum appointment, we made the decision that, should we get pregnant again, we would place the stitch at 11 weeks, regardless of the risks, and follow it with strict bed rest. In addition, I would take weekly 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone injections (also known as P-17 shots), to try and prevent a premature rupture of membranes. My doctor was devastated that we had delivered Alexander early and vowed to do whatever he could do to take us beyond 24 weeks in our next pregnancy. We gave him the chance six months later. After a 6-weeks miscarriage, we conceived our second set of boy/girl twins. I resigned from work at ten weeks, and had the stitch placed at 11 weeks. Immediately I went on bed rest, but, at my 20 week ultrasound, fundal pressure caused part of Bobby’s water bag to slip below my cervix which, even with the stitch in place, had dilated to one centimeter. I was admitted to the hospital, placed on inverted bed rest to relieve the pressure from my cervix, and told by the nurses and residents to prepare for another severely premature delivery. And my twins were born premature. But, in addition to being a face of loss, I am also a face of hope; after 7 weeks of hospital bed rest, my 27-week twins were born with a 90% chance of survival and health. They were taken to the NICU, where they spent the first two months of their lives on earth, before coming home without assistance of any kind. Their initial follow-ups showed them in the developmental range of their birth age. At nine months old, our son, Bobby, was 30 inches long and 20 pounds, and our daughter, Maya, was 24 inches long and 15 pounds. Both behaved like full-term 9-month olds. And both continue to bring new days of sunshine into our lives.

[Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2010/07/100.html

Elaine
Mom to Blaine
Born at 17 weeks on April 13th, 2010
Ontario, Canada


This is the story of how we lost our little boy Blaine. Even a life this short can make a huge impact. While I wish I still had my son with me, I would not trade those 17 weeks for anything.

The Descent


My husband and I started trying for our second child in December 2009. We were very lucky to get pregnant the first try. I was extremely sick right away with nausea, exhaustion and body aches. But I was very healthy otherwise and the baby was thriving. I was in good condition…exercised regularly and ate well most of the time. I called him my little parasite, I felt like crap because he was draining all my nutrients. It was a good thing and I suffered with joy.

[Read more…]

http://facesofloss.com/2010/07/47.html

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